Clinicians, Researchers Probe Link Between Cholesterol Synthesis Pathway and Disruption of Cancer Metabolism

When the first commercial statin was FDA-approved in 1986 for the treatment of elevated cholesterol, researchers began to investigate what other effects the compound might have. For the past three years, researchers at Penn State Cancer Institute have continued their investigation into the effects of statins in the treatment of cancer, studying the use of the isoprenoid pathway modulators, which are responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol. Raymond J. Hohl, MD, PhD, director, Penn State Cancer Institute, and medicinal chemist Jeffrey D. Neighbors, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and medicine at Penn State College of Medicine, are currently engaged in multiple research efforts. One of these is a preclinical study funded by the Four Diamonds Foundation examining the smaller isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) synthase inhibitors as potential treatments for osteosarcoma, a pediatric cancer. Continue reading “Clinicians, Researchers Probe Link Between Cholesterol Synthesis Pathway and Disruption of Cancer Metabolism”